Sadhana of Mahamudra

September 21

The Sadhana of Mahamudra is a practice text composed by the Vidyadhara Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche, the founder of Shambhala. He wrote the Sadhana in a sacred cave in Bhutan in 1968 at an important turning point in his presentation of the Buddhist teachings in the West.

The Sadhana of Mahamudra is one of the first practices that the Vidyadhara encouraged his students to do, and has a number of important characteristics. This sadhana is a binding factor for our community because students at all levels of practice can participate and receive a true experience or understanding of the spiritual path. Its essential teaching is that the nature of the practice itself undercuts any ideas of spiritual materialism.

This practice is meant for our particular time as a means of overcoming the obstacles of spiritual materialism in our practice, our lives, and the world. Because it was meant for this time, its potency is particularly strong.

The sadhana is based on two main principles—the principle of space associated with the Nyingma school of Tibetan Buddhism and the principle of energy associated with the Kagyü school. The text is full of symbolism that may seem strange. Don't expect to understand it right away. You can simply chant the words and relax into the atmosphere that doing so creates.

The practice lasts about 45 minutes. Texts are provided at the Center for those who don’t already own one.

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